Little Rock Audiology Blog

OTC Medicines and Hearing Loss

Pain relievers you get over the counter, like aspirin and ibuprofen, could do damage in high amounts. Any hearing loss or tinnitus from them is usually temporary, but the side effects are sometimes permanent. As long as you stick with baby aspirin or regular doses of a pain medication, you shouldn&...

Certain Meds Can Damage Your Ears

Hearing loss could be a side effect of your medication. Some diuretics for heart disease, chemotherapies, and antibiotics (especially gentamicin, neomycin, and others in the –mycin family) could damage your ears. Getting better is probably your first priority, but it’s worth contacting Little Ro...

Blow Dryers and Hearing Loss

A hairdryer near your head could be putting out 85 or more decibels of noise—the point that the National Institutes of Health says could put you at risk for hearing loss. You’d probably have to dry your hair for eight hours straight before it did any damage, but that loud part of your beauty reg...

Diabetes and Hearing Loss

Types 1 and 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol affect almost every cell in the body—including the ears. Vibrations from tiny hair cells in your ears send your brain messages about what you’re hearing, but those cells need proper blood flow. All those hair cells are fed nutrien...

What is BPPV and How do You Treat BPPV?

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common form of balance disorder. The success rate for treatment of BPPV is nearly 100%.  Once therapy is completed, dizziness rarely returns. Because dizziness and hearing are so closely related, the testing also includes an audiological examination ...